Favorite Quotes

"For my totem, the alley cat. We share the situation of small predators who easily become prey. I have my equivalent of claws and teeth, and indeed my arched back and loud hiss are my best defenses. When I need to hide my size and weakness, I can look fiercer than I am, but when I cannot talk or threaten or argue my way out of trouble, then I am in a lot of trouble. We are scavengers in the alleys and streets of a society we do not control and scarcely influence. We survive and perish both by taking lovers. Freedom is a daily necessity like water, and we love most loyally and longest those who allow us at least occasionally to vanish and wander the curious night. To them we always return from the eight deaths before the last."


from Braided Lives by Marge Piercy

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Pictures Worth Thousands of Words

One Shot Harris: The Photographs of Charles "Teenie" Harris

Title: One Shot Harris: The Photographs of Charles "Teenie" Harris
By: Stanley Crouch

Stanley Crouch gets the credit as “author”, both in our library catalog and on the book itself. But all Crouch wrote is an introductory chapter, which I skimmed but found dense. In actuality, the book is a collection of photographs by a Pittsburgh photographer, Charles Harris. Crouch expends the proverbial thousand words trying to explain these remarkable photographs which speak for themselves.

The primary subjects are African-Americans living in Pittsburgh during the period Harris worked there, from the 1930s through the 1960s. I confess: my mind registers “photographs of African-Americans” and involuntary runs through the stereotypes that one expects (negative, positive, whatever). Then there is an unsettled feeling… and a small awakening… there are no stereotypes here. Who are these people? Who is this wonderful photographer, who loved his city and his neighbors and had the heart, strength, and talent to record their images so eloquently?

The city and people recorded here: is this really our same country, not so many years ago? From how many thousands of pages of dry history would one learn (or, more likely, forget) what is written on these faces? Does History with a capital H really matter, and is progress our most important product? Those were bad times, they say, and we are lucky to be here, not there, to be us, not them – but then why do they look so alive, so engaged, even happy, while we sit staring blankly at screens?

Photography in black and white: a dead craft you won’t be learning in school. Yet what elegance and power it possesses.

I found this book over in the far corner of the Oversize section of the Central library. There you will find many shelves of remarkable photo collections in book form, assembled by the library over the years. Venture back there in person, browse, and check some out.


View similarly tagged posts: photography

Posted by Tirantes on June 23, 2010 at 11:59 a.m.
1 Comment

Comments

June 28, 2010 at 5:30 p.m.:

There is an archive of his photographs online at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.cmoa.org/teenie/intro.asp.
You're right, some of them are quite powerful. Thanks for the introduction.

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