Santa Cruz County History - Articles


Browsing Local History Articles tagged "hotels"

Capitola Hotel's Heyday, by Ross Eric Gibson
In only 25 years, Capitola went from an 1869 campground to home of one of the top seven coastal resort ... [Read more]

A girl in a formal dress runs across the lobby, then disappears into thin air. In an empty Mermaid Room, ... [Read more]

The hallowed grounds of Mount Hermon's Christian retreat have a colorful past. In 1841 the redwood preserve hosted California's first ... [Read more]

Resorts in the Summit Road Area, 1850-1906, by Stephen Michael Payne
Hotel de Redwood, the first hotel in the Summit area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, was built in 1859, at ... [Read more]

With studies under way to possibly reintroduce the convention industry to Santa Cruz, it might be well to recall its ... [Read more]

Santa Cruz Owes Site to Spud Rush, by Ross Eric Gibson
The clock tower marks the heart of Santa Cruz. But this is hardly an ideal place for a downtown, and ... [Read more]

In the 1890s, the castle-like Sea Beach Hotel was listed among the state's top seven coastal resorts, in a sprawling ... [Read more]

The ghosts of the 116-year-old Aptos Bayview Hotel have been good hosts, only said to move things around on occasion. ... [Read more]

The ranch lands Claus Spreckels purchased in 1872 for about $8l,000 comprised almost all of today's Rio Del Mar (ca. ... [Read more]

The original St. George Hotel rose out of the ashes of an 1894 fire, then perished in a 1990 fire. ... [Read more]

An overgrown, two-tiered fountain near the south entrance to Ben Lomond stands as a relic of the glory days of ... [Read more]

The late 1800s brought a major change in the economic base of Santa Cruz County. Intense lumbering had all but ... [Read more]

Tent City was located on Beach Street, opposite the Casino. It provided less expensive accommodations than those available at the ... [Read more]

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The United States was not at war with Japan when, on December 7, 1941, Japan attacked the U.S. Naval Fleet at Pearl Harbor. The day after, the United States declared war on Japan. During the first part of the War, the newspapers carried articles that reveal fears of external attack ..." [More]

Excerpted from Fear of Attack, Fear of Sabotage, Arrests by Rechs Ann Pedersen