Santa Cruz County History - Articles


Browsing Local History Articles by "Rechs Ann Pedersen"

The Great White Fleet, so-called because the ships were painted white, was a United States naval force of 16,000 men ... [Read more]

The announcement of Susan B. Anthony's upcoming speech appeared in the Sentinel on August 5, 1871. The following notice appeared ... [Read more]

On February 19, 1942, a little more than two months after the United States entered World War II, President Roosevelt ... [Read more]

Citizenship and Loyalty, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
Intertwined throughout the War are the issues of the citizenship and the loyalty of persons of Japanese ancestry. Japanese immigrants ... [Read more]

Alien Land Laws, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
California land laws had been passed prior to World War II and were in effect throughout the War. They denied ... [Read more]

Bibliography, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
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February 19, 1942 (Federal Register, Vol. VII, No. 38). "Whereas the successful prosecution of the war requires every possible protection ... [Read more]

Restrictions on Axis Aliens, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
JAPANESE HERE CAN EXPECT TO BE TREATED FAIRLY, SAYS MOTOKI "I urge all Japanese persons in the Pajaro Valley to ... [Read more]

The United States was not at war with Japan when, on December 7, 1941, Japan attacked the U.S. Naval Fleet ... [Read more]

Evacuation: The Restricted Area, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
Calls for the removal of axis aliens and Japanese-Americans appear in the local newspapers throughout the first months of the ... [Read more]

Evacuation: Public Proclamation No. 1, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
From the start of the War, the U.S. Justice Department had established restricted areas, from which enemy aliens were excluded. ... [Read more]

Evacuation: Public Proclamation No. 4, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
On March 19th, evacuees were advised against about making quick deals when selling or renting property. (see Evacuation: Public Proclamation ... [Read more]

Agricultural Labor Shortage, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
So many men away in military service resulted in shortages of workers and changes in the makeup of the labor ... [Read more]

Shortly after the evacuation from the West Coast was completed, the debate began about whether the evacuees should be allowed ... [Read more]

After the Japanese and Japanese-Americans were evacuated from Military Area no. 1, the order for Italian and German aliens to ... [Read more]

Military Service, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
At the start of the War, Italian Americans and Japanese Americans were serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. Further enlistments ... [Read more]

Local newspaper articles of the time give us a very limited picture of life at Salinas or Poston--or any of ... [Read more]

Each chronology lists major events relating to the Japanese American internment and links to the full-text, local newspaper articles. Each ... [Read more]

Release of the Evacuees, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
From the start of the internment, internees could leave the camps for the purposes of either continuing their collection education ... [Read more]

Return of the Evacuees, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
Although some individuals had returned to the West Coast in 1944, the majority returned after the Western Defense Command lifted ... [Read more]

Each chronology lists major events relating to the Japanese American internment and links to the full-text, local newspaper articles. Each ... [Read more]

Santa Cruz's Town Clock, by Carmen Morones and Rechs Ann Pedersen
The Town Clock, which towers over the convergence of Pacific Avenue and Water and Front Streets, is actually Santa Cruz's ... [Read more]

Annie M. McCaskill, by Rechs Ann Pedersen
Annie M. McCaskill, "Woman of Achievement," "Woman of the Year", was a Santa Cruz businesswoman and civic leader. [Read more]

As the result of the Mexican War, Mexico ceded California to the United States in 1846. A territorial government should ... [Read more]

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Back in the days when the roads leading into town were dirt and narrow, a series of piers lined the coast. Like roots, these redwood structures connected ranchers, miners and loggers to bigger cities and the world. Some of the wharves remain, like the century-old pier in Capitola. Some don't, ..." [More]

Excerpted from The Days of the Sugar Pier: Aptos Wharf Once Stretched Quarter Mile from Shore by Mary Bryant