Santa Cruz County History - Executive Order 9066 and the Residents of Santa Cruz County


Full Text Newspaper ArticleWatsonville Register-Pajaronian. Feb. 24, 1943. p. 4

JAPANESE EVACUEES MUST BE KEPT UNDER STRICT SURVEILLANCE
[Editorial]

Citing sound reasons why it opposes the contemplated program, the Watsonville and Pajaro Valley Defense council has gone vigorously on record opposing the War Relocation authority's plan to release between 25,000 and 40,000 evacuated Japanese from relocation camps into industry and for educational pursuits and also the army's plan to incorporate some 28,000 American born Japanese into combat units.

The protest should receive unanimous backing of other defense councils in the state and along the Pacific coast from whence came the evacuated Japanese. It should also receive earnest consideration by government officials, especially those in the War Relocation authority and the war department.

The defense council stresses one point that no one can dispute - who knows for sure whether a Japanese, whether alien or American born, is loyal to the United States? Even the Japanese evacuees themselves have admitted they cannot tell!

It is absolutely unfair to American boys, who are being taken into the armed services from colleges, and even high schools now, to allow Japanese youths to attend such institutions free from restraint.

Without proper surveillance and control, it is extremely doubtful if released Japanese could work side by side with American agricultural and industrial workers without causing friction and trouble which would hinder greatly the war effort. Since Pearl Harbor, a great majority of usually tolerant Americans have evinced a great change in their attitude and feelings toward anyone of Japanese ancestry.

Americans have been known to "bend over backwards" many times in efforts to be tolerant but the events of Dec. 7, 1941, and subsequent activities of the "yellow aryans" have shown only one thing - the Japanese government is determined to conquer and humble the United States or commit national hari-kari in the attempt.

That's what Americans and the allied nations are up against. It's been said many times since Dec. 7, 1941, but it bears repeating constantly - WE ARE AT WAR AND WE HAVE GOT TO WIN OR BE SLAVES OF THE JAPS AND THEIR AXIS PARTNERS-IN-CRIME.

That reason alone is enough to insure the greatest care in handling alien and American born Japanese WHOM THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT CONSIDERS CITIZENS OF JAPAN AND JAPAN ALONE!

Some of them are loyal, but out of that 25,000 to 40,000 who may be released, without control or supervision by the army, there could be 10 or 12 who could commit enough sabotage to cost thousands of American lives and destroy millions of dollars worth of American property.

The risk is too great. It's better to be safe than sorry. It would be better for all concerned, even the Japanese, if they remain strictly under army surveillance and supervision.

Copyrighted by the Watsonville Register-Pajaronian. Reproduced by permission.