Santa Cruz County History - Films


Full Text Newspaper ArticleSanta Cruz Sentinel-News, Morning Edition. Sept. 28, 1928. p. 3

MURDOCK, FBO PLAYER, FIGURES IN UNSHOT SCENE


Perry Murdock, who is playing the part of a pal of Bob Steele in the FBO production, "The Amazing Vagabond," whose exterior scenes are being filmed in the vicinity of Santa Cruz, probably would have spent last night locked in a box car on the railway siding near Glenwood, except for the fact that Thelma Daniels, Steele's leading woman, left her make-up case behind her when she and other members of the company returned to the city at the end of yesterday's work.

In preparation for the last scene of the day, Murdock was locked in the box car and was subsequently to be pulled out by other members of the cast. Before the scene could be finished, however, the sun dodged behind the clouds to stay, necessitating a halt of activities at that particular remote spot.

Wallace Fox, the director, and Virgil Miller, the chief cinematographer, and other members of the company moved on to the Glenwood station, intending to come back and complete the scene. After a wait of some time, the sun definitely refused to aid the troupe and the company set out for Santa Cruz, Murdock having been completely forgotten.

Half the distance to Santa Cruz had been covered when Miss Daniels discovered the loss of her make-up kit and Jack Sullivan, assistant director, and O. F. Malloy, property man, returned to the Glenwood location to search for it. Arriving there, they failed to perceive it near the station and were moving to the box car some distance away when cries of "Somebody let me out," greeted their ears.

It was soon found that the yells came from the box car. Opening the heavy door which, for the sake of accuracy in the picture, had been locked from the outside, Sullivan and Malloy made the startling discovery that they had involuntarily incarcerated a member of their cast. It appears that Murdock, in the interval that the company had moved on from the box car, had fallen asleep on the straw which covered the floor of the car while he waited in vain for their return. In leaving, the score or more members of the company, traveling, as they were, in several cars, failed to detect Murdock's absence in the confusion incident to the departure. Fortunately for Murdock, he had awakened only a few minutes before the return of Sullivan and Malloy, and had just begun to be uneasy at the time of their propitious arrival.

Copyrighted by the Santa Cruz Sentinel-News, Morning Edition. Reproduced by permission.