Santa Cruz County History - People



Old Solders: Santa Cruz County Civil War Veterans
by Robert L. Nelson

HOCKABOUT, WILLIAM H (1839-1908)

Sawtelle Soldiers Home Records

Headstone of William H Hockabout
William H. Hockabout
Pioneer Cemetery, Watsonville

NAME: William H Hockabout
REGISTER #: 8812

Military History

RANK/CO/UNIT: Pvt/Co I/6th WI Infantry (Iron Brigade)
ENLISTMENT: 1861/06/01 Viroqua, WI
DISCHARGED: 1864/01/01 Culpepper, VA Reenlistment
RE-ENLISTMENT: 1864/01/01
RNK/CO/UNIT: Sgt/Co I/6th WI Infantry (Iron Brigade)
DISCHARGED: 1865/07/14 Jeffersonville, IN End of War
DISABILITY: Bronchitis, Urthral Vistula

Domestic History

BORN: Ithaca NY (1838?)
AGE: 69
HT/CMP/EYE/HR: 5'8"/Lt, Gr, Gr/Literate
RELIGION: Protestant
OCCUPATION: Mason
RESIDENCE: Watsonville
MARRIED SINGLE: Widower
NEXT OF KIN: Clark Hockabout (son) Mrs. Mary Hugh Watsonville

Home History

PENSION AMOUNT: $12
ADMISSION: 1908/03/19
DISCHARGED:
DATE OF DEATH: 1908/05/26
CAUSE OF DEATH: Tuberculosis

General Remarks

PENSION CERT: 154,521
EFFECTS: Personal $9 Cash $7.50
HOW DISPOSED OF: Turned over to Clark Hockabout
BURIAL INFO: Body returned to Watsonville

Watsonville Pajaronian (May 27,1908)

Old Soldier Hears Last Call of Taps
Will Come Home to Join His Honored Comrades in the Hero Brigade of Death's Division

A telegram was received here last evening announcing the sudden death near Los Angeles of W.H. Hockabout, an old and respected resident of Watsonville, who left here about six weeks ago and went to Los Angeles with the hope that the change of climate would be beneficial although he was not seriously ill at the time.

Deceased was born in New York in 1839, and lived an uneventful life until war times, when he enlisted and served four years in the Union army with gallant distinction.

Afterwards he returned home, and later came west. He had been a resident of Watsonville for almost twenty years, following the trade of a mason and in that time made many friends who will regret to learn of his death. His many good qualities, and particularly his patriotism, appealed to all good Americans. He was a member of R.L. McCook Post, G.A.R., and if he had lived would have been here to take part in the Memorial Day services next Saturday.

Deceased had a sister at Viroqua Wis. and two brothers, one at Lennox, la, and one in Palo Alto Cal, and leaves three children, Clark C., F. Ray, and Mrs. C.E. Hoyt.

The remains will be brought here for interment in soldier's plot at the I.O.O.F. cemetery. Particulars will be announced later.

Watsonville Pajaronian (Date Unknown)

Only yesterday one of the G.A.R. men, W.H. Hockabout, was telling the position of the company ("I" of the 6th Wisconsin Volunteers) at the second Battle of Bull Run. Mr. Hockabout was second sergeant of his regiment, but his place in the line was left guide, and that fact caused him to be the last man to cross the ridge when the order of withdrawal, or retreat, came. Also as left guide he occupied the extreme left of a long line of battle made by the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps. He was but one of sixty thousand good men and true, and perhaps fifty thousand of his comrades at second Bull Run have gone where there are no battles.

His story of that fight, and of Gettysburg are well worth hearing or reading, but they are not more interesting than thousands of others soon to pass out of reach.

He carries a letter written by himself to his brother, in 1861, and it shows, better than fancy history, the spirit which animated the soldiers in that great struggle. Many medals and badges are parts of his "keepsake bag". The treasure held dearest by him. His story is but one of many.

Watsonville Pajaronian (May 28, 1908)

G.A.R. Conducted Services

The last sad rites over the remains of W.H. Hockabout were held at the Odd Fellows cemetery [following rites at the Christian Church] at 2 o'clock this afternoon under the auspices of the G.A.R. Many Comrades followed the remains to their last resting-place and old but gentle hands laid the many floral offerings on the newly made grave. The pallbearers were A. Bardmess, P.H. Gough, Edward Allan, Francis Rowlee, JAM. Ice, and HE Trueworthy, all members of the G.A.R.

Research Report by Michael Melland, Research/Lecturer
Carroll College Institute for Civil War Studies, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Sgt. Hockabout (Hauckabout) was an original member of the famed Iron Brigade Westerners in the Army of the Potomac. The Brigade was originally made up of the 2nd, 6th, 7th Wisconsin, and the 19th Indiana. They were supported throughout the war by Battery B, 4th US Artillery and some men from the regiments were "detached" to serve with the battery as Artillerymen. After the terrible casualties in the early campaigns they were joined before Fredericksburg by the 24th Michigan.

William H Hauckabout enlisted with a number of men forming the company in Viroqua, Wisconsin on June 1, 1861. He was mustered into service with his friends as Co. I 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He "veteranized" (re enlisted) with men from the regiment/company in October 1863 and had been promoted to corporal and sergeant. He suffered battle wounds at Laurel Hill and mustered out with the Regiment on July 15, 1865. The Sgt. would have served in every major battle fought in the eastern theatre of the war and would have been tough as nails. For more information on the Iron Brigade see "The Iron Brigade", a Military History, by Alan T. Nolan; In the Bloody Railroad Cut at Gettysburg, by Wm. J.D. Beaudot; An Irishmen in the Iron Brigade, the Memoirs of James P. Sullivan edited by Lance J. Herdeger; Brave Men's Tears; the Iron Brigade at Brauner farm by Alan D. Gaff; The men who Stood Like Iron, by Lance Herdeger.


>>Return to Home Page of Old Soldiers: Santa Cruz County Civil War Veterans

>>Return to "H" Index Page

View similarly tagged articles:

cemeteries, Civil War

Disclaimer:

It is our continuing goal to make available a selection of articles on various subjects and places in Santa Cruz County. Certain topics, however, have yet to be researched. In other cases, we were not granted permission to use articles. The content of the articles is the responsibility of the individual author. It is the Library's intent to provide accurate local history information. However, it is not possible for the Library to completely verify the accuracy of individual articles obtained from a variety of sources. If you believe that factual statements in a local history article are incorrect and can provide documentation, please contact the Webmaster.