Santa Cruz County History - Architecture



The Soquel Avenue Bridge
by City of Santa Cruz Public Works Department

"There have been several bridges previously located at this site. In 1874 a covered bridge was constructed. It was one of three major river crossings over the San Lorenzo River. The 800-foot structure was built at a cost of approximately $15,000. The picturesque covered bridge was styled after "Smith Patent Truss Bridge." The covered portion of the bridge extended 530 feet, making it one of the State's longest covered bridges. In 1890 a trestle was added for a horse car line to the east side, which was later converted to a trolley line.

A concrete and steel girder bridge eventually replaced the covered bridge in 1921. The bridge was then widened to four lanes in 1967 when a four-span concrete I-girder bridge was constructed on the north side. In January 1982, severe floods caused the collapse of the eastbound lanes of the Soquel Avenue Bridge into the river, taking out all the telephone lines between the east and west side of Santa Cruz. The damaged southern portion of the Soquel Avenue Bridge was repaired with a replacement I-girder span in 1984."


Source: Excerpt from the City of Santa Cruz Public Works Department. Soquel Avenue Bridge Project Fact Sheet. February 1999.


View similarly tagged articles:

bridges, San Lorenzo River

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